Our job in 2013

As I look toward 2013 and try to plot out where my explorations into the educational front of technology will take me, this blog post is resonating with me:

"Our job as educators is to actively work at getting better. If you are a classroom teacher, like me, and your job is to cause learning, but you aren’t actively searching for ways to better cause that learning, then you aren’t really doing your job. If you are an administrator and your job is to help support teachers cause learning, but you aren’t actively searching for ways to help those teachers, then you aren’t really doing your job."
-- Alexis Wiggins, international teacher and education writer/blogger

http://modelsbydesign.wordpress.com/2012/12/29/if-you-arent-trying-to-improve-you-really-arent-doing-your-job/

2012 (and arguably 2011) was a year of great leaps and bounds in technology: Phones matched power with laptops; cloud services made connecting to anything, anyone, anywhere easier than ever; online learning and teaching resources absolutely exploded - amazing and exciting times indeed.

But the next year begins a new chapter in the technological revolution of education (and life in general), one in which we begin to learn what it's like to live in this world, to teach in it. And, most importantly, we will need to be able to teach our students to do the same.

The classic definition of what a teacher is and does has to change in order for us to keep doing our job, and this will indeed require work. But, as we all felt at one time when we got into this biz, what more important work is there?

My job, moving forward, is therefore to encourage us all to develop new skills, to hone our current sets, and to advocate for the purposeful design of learning opportunities for all educators.

(This is how I started this school year standing in front of my faculty. With this post I am reaffirming my promise to help all of us teach, whatever that means today...)

I don't know about you, but I'm tremendously excited to get 2013 started!